The indonesian language

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The indonesian language

My mother was not a foreigner nor were my grandparents. She was fully Indonesian. But at The indonesian language young age, I remember the English language being instilled more than Indonesian.

The indonesian language

My family did not live in an English-speaking country nor did my family have a The indonesian language proficiency in English than Indonesian.

Yet I was taught to learn English and was sent to English-speaking schools to cement English as my primary language. I do not know why my parents chose to do this, whether the choice was based economically or educationally.

But the deed was done, and now, I go to restaurants and to shops speaking in choppy Indonesian or hearing choppy English from the staff. The staff regularly look at me as an oddball. It does help that I look a bit foreign to prevent it from happening every time.

The indonesian language

But those who can see a true Indonesian a mile away raise their eyebrows whenever we open dialogue. I try to respond in my choppy Indonesian, but they giggle under their breath, which always makes me red from both embarrassment and frustration.

I have adopted a foreign accent, many say. There is as much folklore as there are cultures, which can span to the hundreds or thousands. But every book I have read about my culture has always been in English. And they are all written from outside perspectives.

I sometimes feel extremely isolated whenever I come home to my country, because of this language barrier. And I feel that many Indonesians who live in the urban centers also feel this invisible wall that prevents clear communication.

My struggle to actually learn about my heritage is not because I follow nationalistic philosophies far from it. Our people, having little spending power, have become more and more consumerist. And with the importation of foreign entertainment and media, there are clear signs that point to our own traditions dying as a result of our future citizens becoming more akin to other cultures.

Surprisingly, there was recently an interview focusing on an Australian couple who are actors in a theatrical production of an Indonesian legend. But the thing that shocked me was that they showed an interest in Indonesian culture and were willing to share a foreign culture with a large audience.

The sad truth is that I am more inclined to believe that the traditions of Indonesia will be mostly protected and performed by foreigners.

My attitude to Indonesian culture is neither one of disdain nor of embarrassment, but disdain and embarrassment are emotions that I feel about how locals have sidelined culture to make way for the shallow economic and scientific progress of our country.

They are ignoring the important fact that culture can be capitalized to attract tourists and foreign investors to come to the country.

But with Indonesian cultural buildings being replaced by giant luxury shopping malls, are other young people supporting this replacement or do they oppose it? Although I have become a pariah in my own country because of my primary language, there is no reason for me to despise my own heritage — despite many others claiming that I do.

And when I try to explain this to whomever I come across, they instantly raise their eyebrows because they do not understand my choppy Indonesian. We are looking for articles and opinions from experts in a variety of fields, as well as others with strong writing skills.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the official stance of The Jakarta Post.But at a young age, I remember the English language being instilled more than Indonesian.

(Shutterstock/File). Have you ever wondered what language a webpage or blog you glanced at might be in? Or are you having a hard time telling apart one language from another?

Other articles where Indonesian language is discussed: Malay language: of the Republic of Indonesia, Bahasa Indonesia, or Indonesian. A Malay pidgin called Bazaar Malay (mĕlayu pasar, “market Malay”) was widely used as a lingua franca in the East Indian archipelago and was the basis of the colonial language used in Indonesia by .

Client Portal Language Selection. English; Italiano; Norsk; Magyar; Arabic; Deutsch; Français; Ελληνικα; Slovenčina; Urdu. Indonesian (Bahasa Indonesia) Indonesian, an Austronesian language, is a standardized form of Malay and is spoken throughout Indonesia.

About 30 million people speak Indonesian as their first language and a further million speak it as a second language. Get your best experience of learning bahasa Indonesia with us! By providing effective and communicative language teaching and class activities, we believe that our method of teaching will make learners feel at ease and well motivated.

Indonesian language - Wikipedia